Faculty of Science

Postgraduate student research profiles

Postgraduate research at UWA's Science Facilities is prolific.

To help you find what you want, we have included our postgraduate research profiles by School or Centre, or you can search by keyword or name, or you can browse the full list.

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Benjamin Hug

School of Physics, M013
The University of Western Australia
35 Stirling Highway
CRAWLEY WA 6009
Australia

Phone: (+61 8) 6488 2724

Start date

Jan 2011

Submission date

Jan 2014

Benjamin Hug

Thesis

Advanced Radiotherapy Techniques - Development and Modelling of Advanced Radiation Guided Technologies

Summary

Recent developments in technology have provided the ability to treat cancer using radiotherapy treatment plans and delivery methods of high complexity and precision. The potential for optimising patient treatments is unprecedented, as is the potential for inadvertently delivering incorrect radiation doses. Currently there are no methods for directly monitoring the details of the radiation beam as it is treating the patient. As such, it is not only likely that treatment delivery errors could go unnoticed, but without beam monitoring devices we are not making optimal use of current technology.

A proposed solution is a device which is situated between the radiation source and the patient through which the radiation beam can pass allowing the intricacies of the beam to be monitored. My project is going to utilise computational modelling to examine the relationships between these beam intricacies and the characteristics of a device for monitoring the characteristics of the treatment beam with the aim of improving the quality and safety of patient treatments.

Why my research is important

Researchers from the University of Sydney have developed an optically based fluence detector which will be used to monitor intricacies of the treatment beam. My research will examine the relationships between the details of the beam and the subsequent dose distribution in a patient while also examining the relationship between the beam characteristics and the response of the detector. This will in turn aid in the development of tools for interpreting signals from the device and the development of the fluence device into a clinically useable fluence measuring device. This fluence measuring device will be utilised in a clinical setting improving both the quality and safety of modern radiotherapy treatment deliveries.

Funding

  • Australian Postgraduate Award
  • UWA Top-up Scholarship
  • Cancer Council of Western Australia - PhD Top Up Scholarship