What is science communication?

Science communicators bridge the gap between those researching and working in Science Technology Engineering and Maths (STEM) and the public.

Science communicators use their knowledge to facilitate discussion about important scientific issues. Science communicators play a critical role in interpreting scientific information and making it accessible to diverse audiences.

They engage with business, industry and the community and facilitate dialogue about science and technology to enhance understanding and inform decision making.

Tackling the world's greatest challenges, such as climate change, biodiversity loss and food security will only be effective when we combine first-class science with first-class science communication. Knowledge is not enough: we also need to understand how to engage a wide range of interested communities and stakeholders

Science communicators work with researchers, scientists, technologists, engineers, mathematicians, medical professionals, business and industry, policy-makers and members of the public to engage different communities in discussion about important scientific issues, to enhance understanding and help us all make better decisions about our future priorities

Research in science communication

We research how best to communicate complex scientific information and how to increase the impact of science engagement.

Research in science communication considers the multitude of ways in which different communities can engage with science. Our work is inter-disciplinary, drawing on methods from science, education, psychology, social science, media studies and communications studies.

Our research interests and staff include:

Science communication pedagogy

The theory, method and practice of science communication.

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Impact

'Research impact is the demonstrable contribution that research makes to the economy, society, culture, national security, public policy or services, health, the environment, or quality of life, beyond contributions to academia.' (Australian Research Council, 2016).

Our focus is on effective measurement of scientific impact, and on how people understand 'impact' in the national debate about the value of science.

Leader

Digital tools

Researchers are increasingly turning to digital media and digital tools to engage with public to co-create projects, share the scientific process and analyse data together.

Our research interests include developing practice in open science as a route for public engagement and the development of smartphone apps to allow different communities to gather valuable scientific information.

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Informal engagement with science

To engage diverse communities, we need to be able to draw on a diverse range of strategies.

Our research interests include science improvisation and performance, Citizen Science projects, science cafes and digital media, such as blogs, digital film and podcasting.

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